After the Digital Divide? German Aesthetic Theory in the Age of New Media

Last year, Camden House published After the Digital Divide? German Aesthetic Theory in the Age of New Media ($75, cloth; Amazon; B&N), edited by Lutz Koepnick and Erin McGlothlin.

The editors organized the initial conference in St. Louis in 2006. The book promises to “reconsider the seminal work of German media theorists such as Adorno, Benjamin, and Kracauer in order to explore today’s rapidly changing mediascape, questioning the naive progressivism that informs much of today’s discourse about media technologies.” The essays are:

  • Boris Groys, “From the Image to the Image File-and Back”
  • Carsten Strathausen, “New Media Aesthetics”
  • Diedrich Diederichsen, “Digital Sampling and Analogue Montage”
  • Juliane Rebentisch, “Art, Medium, Progress”
  • Juliet Koss, “Please Hold”
  • Lev Manovich, “Remixability”
  • Margit Grieb, “Fragging Fascism”
  • Michel Chaouli, “What Does It Mean to Read Online? On the Possibility of the Archive in Cyberspace”
  • Nora M. Alter, “Transformations of the Archive”
  • Richard Langston, “Digital Negation and the Fate of Shock after the Avant-Garde”
  • Sabine Eckmann, “Aura, Virtuality, and the Simulacrum”
  • Todd Samuel Presner, “The City in the Ages of New Media: From Ruttmann’s Berlin Die Sinfonie der Groβstadt to Hypermedia Berlin”

It was reviewed by Kristin Veel in the Journal of European Studies.